Is The Cloud Too Expensive?

One of my current Open University modules (M362 – Developing Concurrent Distributing Systems) discusses “The Cloud” quite a bit, especially the Amazon solution. It is supposed to be cheaper and more scaleable than creating your own infrastructure.

Well, it seems that a few years down the line this may no longer be true, at least for some small businesses.

Eric Frenkiel is through with convention and conformity.It was just too expensive.

In Silicon Valley, tech startups typically build their businesses with help from cloud computing services — services that provide instant access to computing power via the internet — and Frenkiel’s startup, a San Francisco outfit called MemSQL, was no exception. It rented computing power from the granddaddy of cloud computing, Amazon.com.

But in May, about two years after MemSQL was founded, Frenkiel and company came down from the Amazon cloud, moving most of their operation onto a fleet of good old fashioned computers they could actually put their hands on. They had reached the point where physical machines were cheaper — much, much cheaper — than the virtual machines available from Amazon. “I’m not a big believer in the public cloud,” Frenkiel says. “It’s just not effective in the long run.”

It’s funny that the Cloud is now convention, because it certainly wasn’t when M362 was initially written.

via Why Some Startups Say the Cloud Is a Waste of Money | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com.

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New Year, New Me?

Hello 2013, you snuck up on me a bit there. 2012 has been a bit of a busy year and has ended rather earlier than I thought. Still, here we are in a brand new year.

I had loads going on in 2012, although my (irregular, rare) readers wouldn’t know it due to the paucity of blog entries in the latter half of the year. I have been a rubbish blogger over the last six months and I would like to write a lot more in 2013. We shall see.

Last year saw me complete two Open University modules: M257 and T306. I struggled with M257 (due to both lack of time and interest) but did achieve a grade 4 pass, while I enjoyed T306 rather more due to the nature of the materials. I have found systems thinking to be an immensely useful too for all sorts of situations and I was fully engaged with the course over its nine months run, when I did well enough in the exam to get a grade 2 pass. This means that I am well on the way to getting a 2:1 BSc (hons) in Computing and Systems Practice once I’ve finished the final four modules over the next two years.

I have less than two years left of OU study! Hurrah! Also: shame! I’m enjoying this experience immensely, but it’s taking up too much of my spare time and I have other things I’d like to do, like spend time with my wife and daughter.

2013 brings two modules, both Java-based: M362 and M256. Netbeans is going to be getting a battering this year for sure. I struggled a bit with concurrency in M257, so M362 will need a bit of extra work, and the exams in these programming modules are hard. I should probably book a week or so off prior to my exams for some intense revision because I really want to do well in these modules, if only to improve the latent developer in me.

I will do better this year, I will. I was repeatedly behind with my OU work in 2012, I must not let that happen this year. I won’t. I must get more organised. Yes.