David and Jeremy want your kids to die (unless you’re rich)

rutty:

Rufus is a proper shot in the arm for the NHS (see what I did there?).

Hope this provides enough impetus to the opposition to STOP the sell-off of the NHS

Originally posted on The Dog's B'logs:

So, last night I was on The Jonathan Ross Show with Robert Lyndsay. We’re promoting the show we’re in together so you’ll hopefully see us on lots of things together over the coming months. Well, in truth, hopefully you’ll just come and see the show :)

I also came out. Yes. That’s right. I know we live in enlightened times, but it was still very hard to do. In case you missed it, I’ll repeat it.

I’m… I’m… I’m going to become [bork]… a politician.

In May, I will be standing as a prospective Member of the European Parliament, and doing so for The National Health Action Party.

For anyone who follows me on Twitter, I doubt that my party of choice will come as too much of a surprise. I’ve been tweeting endlessly over the past few months about the dangers the NHS currently faces, but over Christmas, something…

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Thinking the impossible? Or wishing for the impossible?

rutty:

Love this. My work aren’t /that/ bad but you do wonder at some of the wildly optimistic assumptions that emerge from contract discussions.

Originally posted on James Christie's Blog:

At EuroSTAR 2013 in Gothenburg there was a striking contrast between messages coming out of tutorials that were taking place at the same time.

Ian Rowland was talking about how we can do amazing things by “thinking the impossible”. Meanwhile, along the corridor I was giving out a much more mundane and downbeat message in my tutorial about how testers can work constructively with auditors.

I was talking about how auditors are allergic to statements of brainless optimism. Plans should be based on evidence that they are achievable, not on wishful thinking that defies the evidence.

You might think Ian was contradicting me, but I was entirely happy with his message when he repeated it in a later keynote.failure is not an option

In my tutorial I referred to a tweet from James Bach that made the telling point that “people who say failure is not an option are in fact selecting the failure…

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There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a . . . you know the rest

Originally posted on Why Evolution Is True:

From the Smithsonian website:

Once you’ve picked your jaw from the floor, here’s what you’re looking at: the final stop of this zoom, which spans multiple orders of magnitude, is a little bacterium. That bacterium is resting on a diatom, a class of algae that are known for their silica shells. The diatom is, in turn, sitting on an amphipod, a type of shell-less crustacean.

Reddit’s adamwong246 said it best, “There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a frog on a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea!”

The animated gif was made by James Tyrwhitt-Drake using a scanning electronic microscope at the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility. Tyrwhitt-Drake runs the blog Infinity Imagined.

08_22_2012_fractal-life

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A most bizarre and mysterious cocoon

rutty:

It’s left out a gate. Rubbish

(Also, the images above don’t seem to be appearing for me. Click through to Jerry Coyne’s site to see them. Amazing and mysterious)

Originally posted on Why Evolution Is True:

by Matthew Cobb

This bizarre photo was posted the other day on reddit’s “whatsthisbug” subreddit by Decapod73, with the following information: “Seriously, who makes egg cases like this? Just under 2cm across, Southern Peruvian Amazon”

The various suggestions in the discussion include moth/not moth, harvestman/not harvestman. No one has an answer so far.

Decapod73 says that s/he initially thought it was an ermine moth caterpillar that had started making a cocoon but then got distracted. But then more of the damn things started turning up… Cue creepy music.

Heres one on the underside of a tarpaulin, also by Decapod73 (this was posted a couple of months ago):

So. Ideas anyone? In particular, has anyone from Peru seen this kind of thing before? My guess is a small moth, but I think we need not only an ID, we also need an explanation for the “fencing” – is it to…

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The truth about vaccinations: Your physician knows more than the University of Google

Originally posted on Violent metaphors:

“A cousin of my mom’s survived Polio and lived the rest of his life with its effects. He was not expected to live past his teens but made it to his 40s. I am grateful that modern science can protect us from Polio and other diseases and I choose to take advantage of modern science to give my kid better odds of not dying from a preventable disease. I had heard a lot of noise from people claiming vaccines caused Autism, but never saw any clear evidence. It just seemed to me like people really wanted to point to something as the cause and they latched onto vaccines.”–Jennifer

I have been getting into a lot of discussions about whether vaccines are safe in the last few days. I’m not sure if it’s because of a post going viral about a (terrible) Italian court ruling last year (In contrast, American courts

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