Let It Go

Ruby is utterly obsessed with ‘Let It Go’ from Frozen. To be honest, so am I (just a little bit). I think it’s one of the finest, catchiest songs to come out in many a year.

This amazing video has been doing the rounds for a while, but it’s worth a watch. Brian Hull does an fantastic job using the various Disney/Pixar voices throughout.

Scotland

This is a test to see how well Google+ posts can be shared with WordPress. So far I’m not impressed.

As much as Flickr is annoying me with its removal of certain features (especially the removal of the post to WordPress feature) it is a much better starting point for hosting images for sharing elsewhere. Sharing to a blog from Google+ seems too bloody hard.

Rubbish

A nation of slaves – Charlie’s Diary

One of my favourite writers finds a particularly difficult nail and hits in squarely on the head in his most recent article, and asks a questions that will be sure to have Daily Mail readers choking on their Nescafé:

Today, in the political discourse of the west, it is almost unthinkably hard to ask a very simple question: why should we work?

via A nation of slaves – Charlie’s Diary.

It’s a very interesting read.

David and Jeremy want your kids to die (unless you’re rich)

rutty:

Rufus is a proper shot in the arm for the NHS (see what I did there?).

Hope this provides enough impetus to the opposition to STOP the sell-off of the NHS

Originally posted on The Dog's B'logs:

So, last night I was on The Jonathan Ross Show with Robert Lyndsay. We’re promoting the show we’re in together so you’ll hopefully see us on lots of things together over the coming months. Well, in truth, hopefully you’ll just come and see the show :)

I also came out. Yes. That’s right. I know we live in enlightened times, but it was still very hard to do. In case you missed it, I’ll repeat it.

I’m… I’m… I’m going to become [bork]… a politician.

In May, I will be standing as a prospective Member of the European Parliament, and doing so for The National Health Action Party.

For anyone who follows me on Twitter, I doubt that my party of choice will come as too much of a surprise. I’ve been tweeting endlessly over the past few months about the dangers the NHS currently faces, but over Christmas, something…

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Thinking the impossible? Or wishing for the impossible?

rutty:

Love this. My work aren’t /that/ bad but you do wonder at some of the wildly optimistic assumptions that emerge from contract discussions.

Originally posted on James Christie's Blog:

At EuroSTAR 2013 in Gothenburg there was a striking contrast between messages coming out of tutorials that were taking place at the same time.

Ian Rowland was talking about how we can do amazing things by “thinking the impossible”. Meanwhile, along the corridor I was giving out a much more mundane and downbeat message in my tutorial about how testers can work constructively with auditors.

I was talking about how auditors are allergic to statements of brainless optimism. Plans should be based on evidence that they are achievable, not on wishful thinking that defies the evidence.

You might think Ian was contradicting me, but I was entirely happy with his message when he repeated it in a later keynote.failure is not an option

In my tutorial I referred to a tweet from James Bach that made the telling point that “people who say failure is not an option are in fact selecting the failure…

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There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a . . . you know the rest

Originally posted on Why Evolution Is True:

From the Smithsonian website:

Once you’ve picked your jaw from the floor, here’s what you’re looking at: the final stop of this zoom, which spans multiple orders of magnitude, is a little bacterium. That bacterium is resting on a diatom, a class of algae that are known for their silica shells. The diatom is, in turn, sitting on an amphipod, a type of shell-less crustacean.

Reddit’s adamwong246 said it best, “There’s a bacterium on a diatom on an amphipod on a frog on a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea!”

The animated gif was made by James Tyrwhitt-Drake using a scanning electronic microscope at the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility. Tyrwhitt-Drake runs the blog Infinity Imagined.

08_22_2012_fractal-life

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